Backdrop

Backdrop

Low Light outside and Dim room light can be solved easily.

Note: my backdrops taking shape!

Rainy afternoons look beautiful outdoors but you need to shoot on 1/4 second……………….so You   should use a   tripod.

If you want ENOUGH light in a room, you need the flashes to the right. They are powerful enough to light up a room to get the perfect shot…and not to be too intrusive when you shoot.

These instruments are not made for the point and shoot.  They are precision instruments for taking great photographs! Yes! This does cost more but in the end you will be proud when your equipment is working, well when you really only have split seconds.

My Backdrop Taking Shape

My Backdrop Taking Shape

You can compare prices, and figure how you want to piece your equipment together, but look to the right side bar and see that I have put together camera pieces that I think are a good fit.  This equipment has been proven to take sell-able professional photographs.  Changing out to whatever you think would be more workable for you is ok too.  Everything is “Trial and Error”. I hope to make direction not dictation.

If you are contemplating purchasing equipment off my site,  I want you to know that you are not paying more, at all, and you may be given offers that no one else is receiving. There will be free shipping offers and some coupons or discounts.  I do not get paid operating this site so If you appreciate receving the information please purchase from clicking on the photos on the right and throwing me a small commission.  Keeps me running! Thank you. 

Dark inside and no special lighting.

Dark inside and no special lighting.

5 Responses to “Taking Great Low Light Photographs”

  1. Nice shots. Liked your suggestions.

  2. I see this question day in and day out arnuod here. The honest truth is that today, current model dSLRs from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Olympus all take great photographs. In general, it’s a myth that there is a dSLR that’s best for a newbie photographer. What I can tell you is that Sony was the first to actually include help screens for photographers in their 3 new bodies, the A230, the A330 and the A380. Nikon just followed with their latest entry level dSLR, and Sony has done it again with their new A500 and A550.Other brands have yet to do this, but bet it’s coming. However this isn’t a deal breaker kind of thing so don’t get too caught up in it. So back to using the camera, they all work in a similar fashion, they all have the shutter button in the same place if you know what I mean.The only con I can think of for the entry level dSLRs is Nikon not including a autofocus motor. I don’t shoot nikon but I see owners of the nikon d40, d60, d3000 and d5000 complaining about it when certain lenses become manual focus. You won’t have that issue with Canon or Sony Alpha.If you plan on doing low light high ISO photography, there can be differences as some cameras are cleaner in low light. The general rule of thumb is the more expensive the body, the better the sensor and the processor, and this will result in cleaner images.And the lower price of say 500-600 bucks, I’d say Canon has the edge, then nikon then Sony. But as you get to the 900 dollar price point, I’d say the new Sony A550 is the champ.If you are set on Canon or Nikon at the lower price point, I’d go Canon. The no autofocus motor at the bottom end with Nikon is a deal breaker. It’s fine with most lenses until you come across that one you want and it won’t AF on your body, then you’ll feel differently. Either way, there are so many reviews by pros on the web for all these cameras, you need hit the search engines and do some serious reading.

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